Neo Natters: An inspirational approach to FICare

The passion and dedication of neonatal professionals never fails to astonish us, and we’re so delighted when we have the opportunity to share the stories of our hardworking colleagues. Today is the turn of Jen Cuffe and Julie Kearney, colleagues from the Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, who are working tirelessly to develop and deliver an innovative new approach to FICare: Neo Natters.

Neo Natters began its life as a parent drop-in session that gave families the opportunity to chat directly with staff about their concerns or questions. According to Julie Kearney, matron at Blackpool Victoria Hospital’s neonatal unit, it quickly became apparent that parents were seeking a more informal environment where they could meet in the company of other neonatal families and chat about their experiences in a relaxed environment.

“We encouraged parents to come along for coffee and cake to meet other families, chat about their fears or experiences, and to tell us what we could be doing better,” said Julie. “We took their advice on board and, with the help of some promotional posters and encouraging colleagues, Neo Natters was born.”

Julie teamed up with Jen Cuffe, a former NICU parent at the hospital, who provided invaluable insight into the resources and facilities that would be most helpful to parents with babies in the neonatal unit.

“Having experienced the struggle of splitting time between older children and a baby on the neonatal unit, I know how important it is to provide flexible support that embraces the varied needs of the families who arrive on the unit.

Working together, Jen and Julie began developing Neo Natters into an inclusive and responsive FICare resource that adapted to the changing needs of Blackpool Neonatal Unit’s babies and families. One of the first supplementary services developed was mobile Neo Natters, which was built around a branded trolley that allowed Neo Natters to visit parents who wanted or needed to remain cot side. Jen and Julie took the time to pay parents a personal visit, providing a friendly ear to give families the opportunity to discuss their thoughts or concerns.

The mobile trolley also made it possible for Neo Natters to come to those in transitional care, so all parents felt included regardless of their baby’s place in their neonatal journey. The Neo Natters team continued to take on feedback from families to provide further supplementary services in the form of ‘Dads Matter’ sessions, Chaplaincy visits, and are currently sourcing support for mindfulness sessions as they seek to meet the varied needs of their families.

Together, Jen and Julie have transformed Neo Natters into an innovate, parent-centred FICare resource that helps each family navigate their NICU journey from start to finish, and even beyond. Families who have graduated from Blackpool Hospitals neonatal care are invited to join ‘Nurtured in Neonates’ sessions. These sessions are held once a month for any child up to five years old (along with their siblings) who has been discharged from NICU. They provide a safe space for children and parents alike to socialise with other families who have similar experiences.

According to Jen and Julie, the implementation of this support has fostered a culture of trust, ensuring most issues can be mitigated before they become a problem for the parent or the unit. As a result, the trust has 100% satisfaction scores, boosting confidence in parents and prompting many staff members to engage in promotion of the Neo Natters programme.

While some of the changes made by the Neo Natters team have required significant planning and administration, there are many other small actions completed by the team that have had a big impact on the unit’s families. These include:

  • Managing links between hospitals pre- or post-transfer to ease the process, including offering travel and parking information
  • Providing an admission checklist
  • Providing parent orientations on arrival in NICU, including log in information for vCreate
  • Arranging a parking pass
  • Ensuring parents receive three hot meals a day cotside
  • Fostering a matneo link within the Trust
  • Dynamic action tracker to identify, mitigate and action

Jen and Julie also go out of their way to ensure they mark every holiday and event, helping parents and siblings feel more connected to their new family member, and providing support for families splitting time between their children.

While this service has become an invaluable part of the unit, it hasn’t been without its challenges. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Jen and Julie highlighted funding and time commitment as two of their largest hurdles. Additionally, the complex social needs and varied experiences of the families who find themselves on the unit require a very flexible approach. According to the team, mental health provisions are also a key concern in their plans moving forward; while they are able to signpost and have a counsellor available for support, the unit doesn’t currently employ a psychologist who is qualified to provide immediate mental health advice to parents in need.

When asked what advice they would give units hoping to implement the Neo Natters service, Julie and Jen emphasised how important it is for teams to persevere and to be consistent. Using the feedback of families on their unit, the Neo Natters team continually adapted to the needs of the parents and babies, providing a reliable service that was delivered without fail. Even when face with low engagement, the team continued to consider how they could alter their support offer to meet the needs of those in their care.

Neo Natters has created a safe space for families, both within the neonatal unit and in the wider community. The hard work of Jen, Julie and their supportive team members has created an innovative and flexible FICare solution that continues to positively impact of the lives of those who find themselves being cared for on Blackpool Neonatal Unit.

On 29th November 2023, we will be hosting Julie and Jen for an exciting webinar delving deeper into their inspirational FICare programme. Join us 1pm – 2pm to find out more about how they created, and continue to deliver, their Neo Natters support offer.  

Dräger is incredibly proud to support the NNA by sponsoring the NNA Shared Learning & Best Practice in Neonatal Care Scholarship.

Dräger is an international leader in the fields of medical and safety technology.

Visit the Dräger website:: https://www.draeger.com/en_uk/Home

The Kate Farrer Foundation was established in memory of Dr Kate Farrer, a distinguished neonatal consultant at Addenbrooke’s Hospital and Transport Lead for the East of England. Sadly, Kate died in 2014 following a short illness. Her family set up a foundation in her name & have funded the Kate Farrer Scholarship since 2021.

Visit the Kate Farrer Foundation website: http://www.katefarrer.org/

The NNA is a member of the Council of International Neonatal Nurses (COINN) who we collaborate and partner with closely. COINN is a global organization that represents nurses who specialize in the care of newborn infants and their families. As a COINN partner, the NNA and its members are part of an international community and voice of neonatal nurses across the world. NNA members are automatically joined to COINN membership and can be a valued and integral part of this global voice.

Visit COINN: https://www.coinnurses.org/

Armstrong Medical is the proud sponsor of the NNA Team of the Year Award. Now part of Eakin Healthcare, the company supports neonatal teams across the world, working closely to understand the challenges and pressures faced.  The company join the NNA praising Neonatal teams for their inspirational work as they deliver care to the tiniest and most vulnerable patients.

Armstrong Medical provide options for heated resus, invasive and non-invasive ventilation. NeoFlow® is a complete range of critical and supportive respiratory solutions, designed to give neonates the best possible start in life, from their very first breath.

Visit the  Armstrong Medical website:

https://www.armstrongmedical.net/care-areas/neonatal-critical-care/

vCreate Diaries is a secure video messaging service providing reassurance to parents in NICUs. The vCreate team is working with us on awareness campaigns, communications and video projects to support families during their neonatal journeys.

Visit the vCreate website:: www.vcreate.tv/diaries

Band 8: Lead Neonatal Nurse Researcher / Neonatal Nurse Research Consultant

Coming soon

Advertisement of the career structure available within neonatal nursing

‘Please share this interactive career framework  with your colleagues, networks and communities #BeANeonatalNurse’

Senior ANNP

Coming soon

ANNP (Tier 1 – suggested years 1-5)

ANNPs can progress outside the limitations of the clinical rota.  BAPM have set out career development pathways using the four pillars of advanced practice: clinical practice, leadership and management, education and research in their Framework for Practice.
 
Resources:
NNA ANNP Group – https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/annp-group/
Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Capabilities Framework: A BAPM Framework for Practice – ANNP_Capability_framework_-_for_publication_10-5-21.docx.pdf (hubble-live-assets.s3.amazonaws.com)
ANNP video by J O’Keefe – Advanced Practice Film on Vimeo

Trainee ANNP

About the role
ANNPs work on the medical rota and provide similar care to junior doctors. As part of the trainee role they will achieve clinical competencies in things like cannulation, line insertion, intubation, advanced resuscitation, examination of the newborn and much more.

How to get in to it
Speak to your manager or senior nurse during appraisal. Consider undertaking some of the CPD courses on the next pages to ready yourself for if/when a trainee ANNP post becomes available to complete the essential course.

Trainee ANNP essential course (example): https://www.salford.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/advanced-practice-neonates 
University of Salford. Full time (1 year). Includes non-medical prescribing. 

Other courses/CPD/resources that may help
 NNA ANNP Group – https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/annp-group/
Leadership 
ARNI course 
GIC instructor course 
Involved in: • Research • Audit • Quality improvement programmes • Teaching 

Enhanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (ENNP)

About the role
“Within Newborn Services the role of the ENNP has been utilised to support the medical staffing within the SC and HDU areas. The role follows a medical model and nursing staff gain confidence in managing planned care with the medical staff on ward rounds. They will assess and feedback to the medical staff on infants who deteriorate, prepare infants for discharge and order investigations as per planned care. All plans of care are discussed with the medical team in order to support the safe care of infants in these areas. There is the opportunity to undertake the role of the non-medical prescriber if the ENNP wishes to develop their skills. The experience gained working within the team can often become a springboard to moving towards the ANNP course” Stephanie Dow (Matron for Intensive Care and High Dependency, Manchester Foundation Trust)

How to get in to it
Speak to your manager or senior nurse during appraisal. Consider undertaking some of the below courses for CPD and to ready yourself for if/when a post becomes available

Essential courses, example: https://www.bmh.manchester.ac.uk/study/cpd/courses/nursing -practice-bsc-cpd-units/?pg=2&unit=NURS9319C&unitYear=1 
10 study days 

Other courses/CPD which may help 
NIPE (Newborn Infant Physical Examination) 
Leadership 

Transport

About the role
Neonatal transport nurses provide care and support to babies during transfer to another unit. This may be an acute uplift transfer alongside a doctor or ANNP, such as a transfer to an intensive care unit for ongoing medical/surgical/cardiac care, or it could be an elective repatriation back to their local hospital or to a specialist hospital for an outpatient appointment

How to get into it
Speak to your manager or senior nurse during appraisal. Transport Nurse secondment posts are often available from your regional transport team. Consider undertaking some of the below courses for CPD and to ready yourself for if/when a post becomes available

Courses/Resources
Neonatal Transport Special Interest Group – https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/neonatal-transport-special-interest-group/
Neonatal Transport Group | British Association of Perinatal Medicine (bapm.org) – Neonatal Transport Group | British Association of Perinatal Medicine (bapm.org)
STAN – Home – Neonatal Skills

Community Outreach

About the role
Some Neonatal units have Neonatal Outreach Nurses who will provide ongoing support to parents and carers in the community setting. The nurses may be supported by clinical support workers or Nurse Associates. As a team they will offer specialist care to premature babies and to those babies with complex health needs requiring additional support who have been discharged from the neonatal unit, transitional care or postnatal ward.
 
Outreach nurses are involved in discharge planning, facilitating an early and seamless discharge for the baby and parents to the home environment, and work with other health professionals.
Neonatal Outreach nurses will provide support to parents and carers that may include establishing feeding at home, those with a low birth weight, home oxygen and home phototherapy.
 
How to get into it
Speak to your manager or senior nurse during appraisal. Consider undertaking some of the below courses for CPD and to ready yourself for if/when a post becomes available
 
Courses
UCLAN – community care of the neonate – https://www.uclan.ac.uk/cpd/courses/community-care-neonate-cert  
Safeguarding children, young people and adults level 3
Newborn Infant Physical Examination
 
CPD ‘Working with families to transition from neonatal units to home’ e-learning for health module

Quality Roles

Infant feeding

Coming soon

Bereavement & Palliative Care

Coming soon

Quality Improvement

Coming soon

Shift Coordinator

About the role
 A Shift Leader on the neonatal unit holds supernumerary status to support the daily activities on the Neonatal Unit. They offer clinical expertise and advice to both nursing and medical staff in order to optimise care for babies and families. 

Shift Leaders enhance patient experience by working within the multidisciplinary team in the assessment planning and delivery of care for neonates. Shift Leaders are expected to outline development opportunities and contribute towards ongoing development of the unit. 

A Shift leader needs the ability to organise, prioritise and coordinate own and others work on a shift-to-shift basis. 
 
How to get in to it
Discuss with senior members of the MDT team and identify in your appraisal. Discuss with your Line Manager. Choose an area of specific interest to you within neonates which you can develop within the unit & become involved in any projects in relation to this. Attending deliveries and further exposure too ITU/Escalation Scenarios. 
 
 Other courses/CPD that may help 
 – Leadership 
 – Courageous Conversation Course 
 – Mentorship Qualification 
 – Venepuncture & Cannulation 
 – Clinical Governance & Education 
 – Safeguarding Children – Level 3 
 – ATAIN Modules 

Consolidation of QiS

Coming soon

Completion of QiS

Coming soon

Completion of formal preceptorship programme competencies

Coming soon

Knowledge of educational support available within the neonatal setting

Induction

There will likely be an induction programme designed by the ODN Neonatal Clinical Educators to support newly qualified nurses, or nurses new to neonates in the transition to neonatal staff nurse and in preparation for the Neonatal Foundation Programme, if one is offered by their ODN.

An induction programme might include topics such as:

Basic Clinical Observations and Assessment of the Neonate. Aim: To be able to complete a full and comprehensive assessment of the neonate.

Nutrition and Fluids. Aim: To provide adequate and appropriate nutrition using skills and knowledge to encourage healthy growth.

Infection Control. Aim: To provide a healthy and safe environment and take steps to prevent and treat neonatal sepsis.

Skin Integrity. Aim: To maintain healthy skin integrity

Jaundice. Aim: To identify jaundice and treat accordingly.

Medicines Management. Aim: Can administer medications safely and competently.

Family Integrated Care. Aim: The nurse is able to provide Family Integrated Care.

Recognising the deterioration of the neonate. Aim: The nurse is able to recognise when an infant is deteriorating and initiate resuscitation.

Pain management and assessment. Aim: The nurse understands how to assess and manage infant pain.

Admission, Discharge and Screening. Aim: To provide holistic care from Admission to Discharge.

Professional Conduct, Communication and Documentation. Aim: To work in accordance with the NMC standards and maintain professional accountability.

(Content example taken (with permission) from the Yorkshire & Humber Neonatal ODN induction programme)

On-going educational support

Neonatal ODNs will offer their own programme of educational support. This will include webinars, study days, skills sessions and supporting you to complete qualifications such as a Foundation Programme, QiS, plus Masters and PhD level courses.

The NNA also offer an on-going programme of online and in person learning events.

Access to neonatal placement

As a pre-registration student undertaking a children’s nursing programme, you will hopefully get an opportunity to gain a practice placement on a neonatal unit that offers an opportunity to work within special care, high dependency and intensive levels of care, under the supervision of practice staff. Some Universities accommodate all their students to ensure this neonatal-specific experience happens, while for others, you might need to arrange this experience as an ‘elective’ placement. The latter would also apply to a student on an adult nursing programme.

Placements on a neonatal unit vary between on average 6 to 12 weeks depending on your year of study and whether students have supernumerary status. Student midwives also undertake varying lengths of time on a neonatal unit to gain clinical exposure to babies requiring special care.

To find out more about neonatal placements as a student, view our NNA webinar -‘Making the most of the neonatal placement‘.

We are delighted to tell you; we are now signed up to the UK Government Gift Aid scheme.

This means we can claim back 25p for every pound of your subscription from HMRC – it does not cost you a penny more and this additional income will enable us to support you further with our webinars, conferences, awards, and scholarships. For us to claim Gift Aid on your subscriptions, we need your agreement.

How to help

I want to Gift Aid my subscriptions in the future and those I have paid in the past 4 years to the Neonatal Nurses Association. I am a UK taxpayer and understand that if I pay less Income Tax and/or Capital Gains Tax than the amount of Gift Aid claimed on all my payments in that tax year it is my responsibility to pay any difference.

Please notify us if you:

– want to cancel this declaration
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If you pay Income Tax at the higher or additional rate and want to receive the additional tax relief due to you, you must include all your Gift Aid donations on your Self-Assessment tax return or ask HM Revenue and Customs to adjust your tax code.”

Nurse Consultant

Unit Manager

About the role
The unit manager tends to be a non clinical role but still based within the unit. The aim is to be a highly visible, proactive and a supportive leader of the team. The main aspects of the role include budget and staff management; risk assessment and governance; having an awareness of, and adhering to, trust and national guidelines; supporting new neonatal initiatives; driving forward recruitment and retention initiatives; encouraging collaboration with all members of the MDT; and having the overall responsibility of overseeing the general health and safety of the unit, staff, families and babies at all times. 
 
How to get in to it
Have an interest in management and leadership together with a good background of neonatal knowledge. You will have worked as a shift leader on the unit which will have enabled you to understand team dynamics and shift control. Lead on a specific project on your unit. Show an interest in governance and ask to attend any meetings that will improve your awareness of trust and national initiatives. 
 
Essential courses
QiS 
 
Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
ODN managers development course 
Appraisal training 
Communication courses 
National or local neonatal study days 
Joining a special interest group with the NNA or your ODN 

Band 7: Senior Neonatal Nurse Researcher

Coming soon

Network educator

About the role
Network education can involve delivering aspects of the network education strategy such as teaching on the Foundation Programme, neonatal support worker programme, consultant study days and much more, as well as driving innovation and change within education both in their network and nationally

How to get in to it
Experience of teaching both in clinical practice and to groups of people are essential. You need a passion for teaching and developing staff as well as a desire to drive change and innovation

Essential courses
QIS

Other courses/CPD/resources that may help
NNA LEaRN GRoup – https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/linking-education-research-in-neonatal-care/
Leadership  
Communication skills courses – having difficult conversations, performance management, coaching etc. 
PGCE 
Other teaching courses 
GIC instructor course 

Band 6: Neonatal Nurse Researcher

Coming soon

Band 5: Neonatal Nurse

Coming soon

Network Governance

About the role
The requirement for this role is a senior neonatal nurse with a focus on wider governance issues for neonatal services within the network region focussing on 4 main duties:

– improving access to and egress to and from services at the right time 
– improve operational consistency
– increase productivity 
– improving neonatal outcomes through focussing on patient safety and working alongside families and staff. 

There is a requirement to complete reports reflecting the sharing of learning throughout the network. You would work with national bodies such as HSIB, PMRT and MBRRACE implementing and maintaining governance and quality taking effective action addressing any quality issues with stakeholders.

How to get in to it
This role requires an education to masters level or equivalent senior experience in engagement and leadership working in collaboration with multidisciplinary teams as well as several years of neonatal governance, managing and learning from clinical incidents identifying themes and disseminating learning; experience of QI and leading and managing change and good knowledge of governance processes. 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Unfortunately there are no specific courses for neonatal governance, there are general development courses such as trust level RCA training, patient safety and human factors training, in house complaints management and duty of candour trust online training 

Governance Matron

About the role
The education lead will be responsible for leading the education team on the neonatal unit. The role often involves coordinating training and education, performance management, having difficult conversations and assessing staff competence

How to get in to it
You will need experience as a clinical educator, good leadership and communication skills and a passion for training and education. Speak to your line manager during appraisal

Essential courses
QIS

Other courses/CPD/resources that may help
NNA LEaRN Group –  https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/linking-education-research-in-neonatal-care/
Leadership • PGCE • Communication skills courses – having difficult conversations, performance management, coaching etc. • Other teaching courses 

Risk Link Nurse

Coming soon

Governance role within wider nursing team/Risk Link Nurse

About the role
The role involves a good understanding of patient safety, reducing risk and minimising errors to avoid harm, usually through an incident reporting management system. The role is collaborative linking with co-dependent specialities at divisional safety forums to share and learn from multi-disciplinary incidents affecting neonatal care. This role works closely with neonatal educators to support development and training around patient safety events and supporting high quality care through monitoring and audit such as unit environment, QI projects, patient experience and staff satisfaction.

How to get in to it
Appraisal discussion with appraiser; speak with colleagues within your organisation who are employed in a similar role. Act as a role model, demonstrate an interest in patient safety, improving services through QI, audit, education.

Other courses/CPD that may help
Trust RCA training
Duty of candour training (usually in trust)
Patient safety training

Clinical Educator

About the role
Clinical nurse educators are practice-based nurses whose primary role is educating the workforce. The role varies slightly in different units but often includes teaching on mandatory training, equipment training, supporting students and general neonatal education.

How to get in to it
Show an interest in education, take the lead on teaching a particular piece of equipment or topic area in practice and then speak to your line manager during appraisal

Essential courses
QIS

Other courses/CPD/resources that may help
NNA LEaRN Group – Linking Education & Research in Neonatal Care – https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/linking-education-research-in-neonatal-care/
While not essential, a PGCE may be useful particularly if you want to progress to being a network educator or HEI educationalist. 
Leadership courses • Other teaching courses • GIC instructor • Communication and coaching courses.

A video from Hannah Cousins –  Assistant Clinical Educator

Education lead

About the role
The education lead will be responsible for leading the education team on the neonatal unit. The role often involves coordinating training and education, performance management, having difficult conversations and assessing staff competence

How to get in to it
You will need experience as a clinical educator, good leadership and communication skills and a passion for training and education. Speak to your line manager during appraisal

Essential courses
QIS

Other courses/CPD/resources that may help
NNA LEaRN Group –  https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/linking-education-research-in-neonatal-care/
Leadership • PGCE • Communication skills courses – having difficult conversations, performance management, coaching etc. • Other teaching courses 

Matron

About the role
Responsible for staffing and recruitment, budget management, staff wellbeing, complaints management and management of the band 7 team. Has oversight of sickness, infection control and the clinical environment, risk and medicines management, FiCare, digital management including badger, bereavement and much more 

How to get in to it
Clinical experience as a band 6 and band 7. Identify interest as part of appraisal process. Apply when a matron post becomes available. 

Essential courses
Masters 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
Communication 
Management courses (often offered in trust for things like appraisal delivery, sickness and capability management, recruitment etc) 
ODN (or other) managers development course
Joining the NNA Managers & Matrons Group 

HEI Educationalist

About the role
As an HEI lecturer, you’ll need expertise in your subject area in order to teach students. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical demonstrations, field work and e-learning. 

How to get in to it
Gain experience in teaching and assessing. Speak to your line manager in appraisal 

Essential courses
Most HEIs will require educators to have a Masters degree and a PGCE (post-graduate certificate in education). Some may help you to get these once you have the job but others will insist you have obtained them before applying for a post. 
Many HEIs offer Masters modules and PGCE courses, see individual university websites for details 

Other courses/CPD/resources that may help 
NNA LEaRN Group – https://nna.org.uk/special-interest-groups/linking-education-research-in-neonatal-care/
Leadership • Teaching courses • Communication skills 

The role of nurse educator by Dr. Julia Petty
My name is Dr. Julia Petty, and I am a nurse lecturer specialising in children’s nursing with a particular interest in neonatal care. My nursing career in paediatric and neonatal clinical nursing practice began after a BSc Hons degree in Psychology at Warwick University, when I moved to Great Ormond Street Hospital, London. Here, I trained in children’s and adult nursing before working there for many years in children’s and neonatal surgical care. I then gained my neonatal nursing qualification at St George’s NHS Trust London and worked at the Whittington NHS Trust NICU before moving back to Great Ormond Street for a senior education role on NICU where I worked until 2001. I then worked as Senior Lecturer at City University, London for 12 years leading the neonatal nursing education portfolio. I studied for a MSc, a PGCE and MA in academic practice during this time, In 2013, I moved to the University of Hertfordshire where my role is Associate Professor (learning and teaching) and Senior lecturer child nursing. I teach on the BSc Hons nursing and master’s degree programmes including leadership of modules, face-to-face/online teaching, assessing and supervision of students at all levels up to doctorate level.  I am also research active and have completed a Doctorate in Education. As a nurse, educator and post-doctorate researcher, my interests focus on parents’ premature birth experiences, supporting parents in the transition home from NICU, exploring communication needs of neonates and their carers and studying the educational value of digital storytelling. This combination and variety of roles enriches my working life and brings together my experience as a child / neonatal nurse, educator and researcher. My role and related activities enable me to engage in both education and research while supporting students on their nursing career and education pathway, which is a privilege to be part of.

Director

About the role
The Network Director provides overall leadership for the Network 

How to get in to it
The role of Network Director is one which can be undertaken by both clinical and non-clinical staff. This means that the candidate could be nursing, medical, AHP or via a business /management route 

Essential courses
A Master’s degree 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
Leading across Organisations 

Network Deputy Director/Senior Lead Nurse

About the role
Not all network structures are the same but some utilise the Senior Lead Nurse role as a deputy for the Network Director and as line manager to the expanding network team. The network has a vast work programme with a wide scope encompassing the work of the Quality Improvement lead nurses, Care Coordinators, Allied Health Professionals and Education team. The senior lead nurse maintains oversight of each team and supports progress with their work programme with direct line management responsibility for the team. The Senior Lead Nurse leads projects and innovations across the region and links to wider strategic regional and national initiatives.

If you are interested in the role and would like to see a copy of the job description email your ODN.

How to get in to it
You will need extensive neonatal nursing experience across a variety of roles such as education, management and advanced clinical practice support the development of your knowledge and experience. Network/strategic experience is also beneficial. Being involved in national groups and gaining experience beyond the neonatal unit is also required. 

Essential courses
Masters degree 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
Join NNA Special Interest Groups

Lead Nurse - Divisional Level

About the role
Supportive role for managers, educators and clinical leads within a locality and across the network. Specific focus such as governance or data supporting all units in the ODN. Support of Special Interest groups and Task and Finish Groups. Links to reginal and national work. Giving neonatal care a voice. Sharing information about the network and national neonatal drivers widely. Insight into clinical pathways. Support NCCR implementation. Engaging with clinical colleagues. Supporting educational events. 

How to get in to it
Good length of experience in neonatal services with a variety of roles. Experience of local QI work. Involvement in the network to understand what it does and expand experience. Take interest in national influences on neonatal and maternity care.

Essential courses
Masters degree 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
Quality improvement 

Chief Nurse

Coming soon

Head of Nursing

About the role
Operationally and professionally responsible for the neonatal unit and those within it; strategic development of neonatal services within your service and wider network services as a tertiary unit 

How to get in to it
You will need a wealth of experience in neonatal nursing and experience at a unit manager and matron level. 

Essential courses
Masters degree 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
Postgraduate certificate in business management 
Range of experience in neonatal medicine, surgery and transport 
Experience of working in different levels of units 
Self reflection 
People management 
Joining NNA Special Interest Groups/webinars

Lead Nurse - Unit Level

About the role
Supportive role for managers, educators and clinical leads within a locality and across the network. Specific focus such as governance or data supporting all units in the ODN. Support of Special Interest groups and Task and Finish Groups. Links to reginal and national work. Giving neonatal care a voice. Sharing information about the network and national neonatal drivers widely. Insight into clinical pathways. Support NCCR implementation. Engaging with clinical colleagues. Supporting educational events. 

How to get in to it
Good length of experience in neonatal services with a variety of roles. Experience of local QI work. Involvement in the network to understand what it does and expand experience. Take interest in national influences on neonatal and maternity care.

Essential courses
Masters degree 

Other courses/CPD that may help 
Leadership 
Quality improvement 

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